Art

The Devils (1971)

The Devils is not a movie for everyone. In fact, according to Warner Brothers, it’s not a movie for anyone.

mv5bnza1nmm3ndktyzrkmi00njzjlthinjatmwm2njhiy2jlm2nmxkeyxkfqcgdeqxvymtqxnzmzndi-_v1_The Devils is a 1971 drama written and directed by Ken Russel set in 17th century France chronicling the final weeks of Catholic Priest Urbain Grandier’s (Oliver Reed) life in the fortified city-state of Loudun. King Louis XIII and Cardinal Richelieu have begun plotting the destruction of all of France’s fortified cities in order to rule over them all, however, Louis XIII has made a deal with the Governor of Loudun to keep its walls standing. The Governor, recently deceased, has passed control of the city over to Grandier who is now a target of the united heads of Church and State. Louis, Richelieu, and a local Baron decide to set in action a devious plan to remove Grandier from political power by framing him for demonic possession and heresy so they can finally take control over Loudun once and for all. As wild as all this sounds, this is all loosely based on real historical events. Ken Russel based his screenplay on Aldous Huxley’s non-fiction novel, which itself is based on the 17th century Loudun possessions. The Devils is quite removed from the original source material and is very clearly a dramatized retelling of the events that transpired.

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Don’t Look Now (1973)

Today marks a special day in Coffee and Illithids history. A while ago, I formally asked on my Facebook page (*cough* throw me a pity like *cough*) for recommendations and I got precisely one in reply. Being the wonderful human being I am, I kept procrastinating and putting off watching it until now. I’m a butt, sorry Anthony.

mv5bymuxmmy1zjytyjbhys00owu2lwe2ymetmjm0mtg1zwy2oty1xkeyxkfqcgdeqxvyntewndcxndc-_v1_Don’t Look Now is a 1973 horror-drama from British director Nicolas Roeg, a man who has directed a bunch of movies I’ve never even heard of. It stars Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie as John and Laura Baxter, two architects who are grieving the recent loss of their daughter Christine who died by drowning in a pond by their cottage. The Baxters are commissioned by a Venetian priest to help restore an old church. While in Venice Laura meets a pair of women, one who is psychic, and John begins to have odd visions and flashbacks to his daughter. The psychic while at first is warm and welcoming, eventually warns Laura that John will be in danger if he stays in the city any longer and that he must leave immediately. Odd happenings continue to happen to John and Laura the longer they stay in Venice, until John’s odd visions clearly become something more supernatural and sinister.

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Under The Skin (2013)

Arthouse films aren’t for everyone. They’re often vague, confusing, and come across as being strange and different for the sake of being strange and different. Now, I’m by no means an authority on arthouse and experimental cinema, but I’ve been through the surrealist rodeo a couple times. Being someone who really likes the visual and technical elements of film, I can enjoy certain art films for their imagery and cinematography, even if their #2deep4me messages fly over my head.

mv5bmtu1mdewmdg4nl5bml5banbnxkftztgwotk3ntcxmte-_v1_sy1000_cr006751000_al_Under the Skin is a sci-fi horror film directed by Jonathan Glazer. While definitely an art film, Under the Skin’s plot is easier to digest than something like, say, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain. That being said, it doesn’t reduce how evocative and mesmerizing the imagery is in this movie, nor does it make some of the scenes any less uncomfortable to sit through. The movie follows a simple premise. An alien woman (Scarlett Johansson) is sent to Earth to process men for an unknown reason. In order to capture the men she needs, she decides to pose as a beautiful young woman and seduce them. As she ensnares prey after prey, her time among humans begins to rub off on her and she becomes curious about the different experiences and emotions humans go through. See? That wasn’t so hard. (more…)